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How do Senior Players adjust after selection?

Not sure whether asking this question without a rank or selection is ideally suited but neverthless if anyone here, who is 29+ and makes it to the list or you happen to know from your training days, please share your thoughts on this issue.
The expectations of a 24 year old and 29 year old, making the cut, have slight divergence, with the opportunity cost of 5 years reflects clearly on the 29 or 30 year old.

Detailed personal accounts would serve better here, please refrain from posting public info like, Gaurav Agarwal cracked when he was 29, that is not what I intend to know.

Comments

  • edited February 13
    I'm 26 now, if I make it in this 2019 attempt, I will be 28 when I join the training.

    You are right in your observations, because I've always had this question on my mind throughout my journey so far but recently I found out a personal answer to this.

    I'm not sure how others would feel but this is my personal opinion.

    When I was a fresh graduate, I only had small dreams and one of them was to pass this exam. I only knew how to dream but was rather inexperienced about how to live the dream, especially for something like this exam.

    I was well experienced on the creative side of the work, I was good at innovation but I barely had the experience of toiling day in and day out for a year or two, I dint know what consistency in efforts meant, I didn't know what patience meant, I didn't know what kind of efforts are required to compete on a all India level.

    The repeated failures taught me all this. And with each failure, the dreams started to widen their horizon beyond this exam. That is where i realized that passing this exam is only the beginning. The real task lies ahead of it when you are working in the dynamics of the real world. There is so much to be done and there is so much that can be done.

    Promotions, salary etc are the last thing on my mind. Nobody knows what is in the store 10 years after tomorrow, 30 years is a super long journey. One thing is sure that if you work super hard and utilize your skills to the fullest, you will never be short of money throughout your life. So the financial side is solved if you know this fact.

    The failures have given me so much of insights and learning about life that I thank my stars now. I am well equipped to handle most of the things in life whereas I didn't have any of these learnings when I graduated. Even if I had somehow passed the exam in the past, I would have definitely failed at some point and that would have been disastrous considering the fact that as a civil servant you are entrusted with heavy responsibilities.

    I may have lost the salary and promotions of last 5 years but I've gained life skills which are worth much more than that. I think, I would be very very happy to shoulder the responsibilities and serve the public at 28 rather than at 22 because I am now sure that my 22 year old personality was no where close to what is needed to be a civil servant.

    Again, I may have taken a little longer to learn to these things where as someone may have learnt these in a little lesser time. But I have zero regrets, it has been a thoroughly enriching journey and no matter how painful it has been I've totally enjoyed it.

    Age matters those who think small, a moment is enough for those who think big. And life is all about making the moments count.

    Life isn't upsc, life isn't about being the secretary to goi. Being a civil servant is just a tiny part of life. It's much much much larger than all that, you can do things that no one can even imagine. All you need is a clear and steady head that empowers you to do wonderful things, failures give you that.
  • pizzza said:

    I'm 26 now, if I make it in this 2019 attempt, I will be 28 when I join the training.

    You are right in your observations, because I've always had this question on my mind throughout my journey so far but recently I found out a personal answer to this.

    I'm not sure how others would feel but this is my personal opinion.

    When I was a fresh graduate, I only had small dreams and one of them was to pass this exam. I only knew how to dream but was rather inexperienced about how to live the dream, especially for something like this exam.

    I was well experienced on the creative side of the work, I was good at innovation but I barely had the experience of toiling day in and day out for a year or two, I dint know what consistency in efforts meant, I didn't know what patience meant, I didn't know what kind of efforts are required to compete on a all India level.

    The repeated failures taught me all this. And with each failure, the dreams started to widen their horizon beyond this exam. That is where i realized that passing this exam is only the beginning. The real task lies ahead of it when you are working in the dynamics of the real world. There is so much to be done and there is so much that can be done.

    Promotions, salary etc are the last thing on my mind. Nobody knows what is in the store 10 years after tomorrow, 30 years is a super long journey. One thing is sure that if you work super hard and utilize your skills to the fullest, you will never be short of money throughout your life. So the financial side is solved if you know this fact.

    The failures have given me so much of insights and learning about life that I thank my stars now. I am well equipped to handle most of the things in life whereas I didn't have any of these learnings when I graduated. Even if I had somehow passed the exam in the past, I would have definitely failed at some point and that would have been disastrous considering the fact that as a civil servant you are entrusted with heavy responsibilities.

    I may have lost the salary and promotions of last 5 years but I've gained life skills which are worth much more than that. I think, I would be very very happy to shoulder the responsibilities and serve the public at 28 rather than at 22 because I am now sure that my 22 year old personality was no where close to what is needed to be a civil servant.

    Again, I may have taken a little longer to learn to these things where as someone may have learnt these in a little lesser time. But I have zero regrets, it has been a thoroughly enriching journey and no matter how painful it has been I've totally enjoyed it.

    Age matters those who think small, a moment is enough for those who think big. And life is all about making the moments count.

    Life isn't upsc, life isn't about being the secretary to goi. Being a civil servant is just a tiny part of life. It's much much much larger than all that, you can do things that no one can even imagine. All you need is a clear and steady head that empowers you to do wonderful things, failures give you that.

    So true :'(

    TALENT is distributed evenly but OPPORTUNITIES are not
  • pizzza said:

    I'm 26 now, if I make it in this 2019 attempt, I will be 28 when I join the training.

    You are right in your observations, because I've always had this question on my mind throughout my journey so far but recently I found out a personal answer to this.

    I'm not sure how others would feel but this is my personal opinion.

    When I was a fresh graduate, I only had small dreams and one of them was to pass this exam. I only knew how to dream but was rather inexperienced about how to live the dream, especially for something like this exam.

    I was well experienced on the creative side of the work, I was good at innovation but I barely had the experience of toiling day in and day out for a year or two, I dint know what consistency in efforts meant, I didn't know what patience meant, I didn't know what kind of efforts are required to compete on a all India level.

    The repeated failures taught me all this. And with each failure, the dreams started to widen their horizon beyond this exam. That is where i realized that passing this exam is only the beginning. The real task lies ahead of it when you are working in the dynamics of the real world. There is so much to be done and there is so much that can be done.

    Promotions, salary etc are the last thing on my mind. Nobody knows what is in the store 10 years after tomorrow, 30 years is a super long journey. One thing is sure that if you work super hard and utilize your skills to the fullest, you will never be short of money throughout your life. So the financial side is solved if you know this fact.

    The failures have given me so much of insights and learning about life that I thank my stars now. I am well equipped to handle most of the things in life whereas I didn't have any of these learnings when I graduated. Even if I had somehow passed the exam in the past, I would have definitely failed at some point and that would have been disastrous considering the fact that as a civil servant you are entrusted with heavy responsibilities.

    I may have lost the salary and promotions of last 5 years but I've gained life skills which are worth much more than that. I think, I would be very very happy to shoulder the responsibilities and serve the public at 28 rather than at 22 because I am now sure that my 22 year old personality was no where close to what is needed to be a civil servant.

    Again, I may have taken a little longer to learn to these things where as someone may have learnt these in a little lesser time. But I have zero regrets, it has been a thoroughly enriching journey and no matter how painful it has been I've totally enjoyed it.

    Age matters those who think small, a moment is enough for those who think big. And life is all about making the moments count.

    Life isn't upsc, life isn't about being the secretary to goi. Being a civil servant is just a tiny part of life. It's much much much larger than all that, you can do things that no one can even imagine. All you need is a clear and steady head that empowers you to do wonderful things, failures give you that.

    Nice put up.....
    Life is much bigger than any job/money etc because many times we see successful people living in depression while a labourer sleeps peacefully :smile:
  • pizzza said:

    I'm 26 now, if I make it in this 2019 attempt, I will be 28 when I join the training.

    You are right in your observations, because I've always had this question on my mind throughout my journey so far but recently I found out a personal answer to this.

    I'm not sure how others would feel but this is my personal opinion.

    When I was a fresh graduate, I only had small dreams and one of them was to pass this exam. I only knew how to dream but was rather inexperienced about how to live the dream, especially for something like this exam.

    I was well experienced on the creative side of the work, I was good at innovation but I barely had the experience of toiling day in and day out for a year or two, I dint know what consistency in efforts meant, I didn't know what patience meant, I didn't know what kind of efforts are required to compete on a all India level.

    The repeated failures taught me all this. And with each failure, the dreams started to widen their horizon beyond this exam. That is where i realized that passing this exam is only the beginning. The real task lies ahead of it when you are working in the dynamics of the real world. There is so much to be done and there is so much that can be done.

    Promotions, salary etc are the last thing on my mind. Nobody knows what is in the store 10 years after tomorrow, 30 years is a super long journey. One thing is sure that if you work super hard and utilize your skills to the fullest, you will never be short of money throughout your life. So the financial side is solved if you know this fact.

    The failures have given me so much of insights and learning about life that I thank my stars now. I am well equipped to handle most of the things in life whereas I didn't have any of these learnings when I graduated. Even if I had somehow passed the exam in the past, I would have definitely failed at some point and that would have been disastrous considering the fact that as a civil servant you are entrusted with heavy responsibilities.

    I may have lost the salary and promotions of last 5 years but I've gained life skills which are worth much more than that. I think, I would be very very happy to shoulder the responsibilities and serve the public at 28 rather than at 22 because I am now sure that my 22 year old personality was no where close to what is needed to be a civil servant.

    Again, I may have taken a little longer to learn to these things where as someone may have learnt these in a little lesser time. But I have zero regrets, it has been a thoroughly enriching journey and no matter how painful it has been I've totally enjoyed it.

    Age matters those who think small, a moment is enough for those who think big. And life is all about making the moments count.

    Life isn't upsc, life isn't about being the secretary to goi. Being a civil servant is just a tiny part of life. It's much much much larger than all that, you can do things that no one can even imagine. All you need is a clear and steady head that empowers you to do wonderful things, failures give you that.

    Very much relatable. Hope you clear this time and me too.
    I am not among these vibrant group of youth that constitutes the common mass today. I am among those intellect group of youth who will lead the nation tomorrow.
  • pizzza said:

    I'm 26 now, if I make it in this 2019 attempt, I will be 28 when I join the training.

    You are right in your observations, because I've always had this question on my mind throughout my journey so far but recently I found out a personal answer to this.

    I'm not sure how others would feel but this is my personal opinion.

    When I was a fresh graduate, I only had small dreams and one of them was to pass this exam. I only knew how to dream but was rather inexperienced about how to live the dream, especially for something like this exam.

    I was well experienced on the creative side of the work, I was good at innovation but I barely had the experience of toiling day in and day out for a year or two, I dint know what consistency in efforts meant, I didn't know what patience meant, I didn't know what kind of efforts are required to compete on a all India level.

    The repeated failures taught me all this. And with each failure, the dreams started to widen their horizon beyond this exam. That is where i realized that passing this exam is only the beginning. The real task lies ahead of it when you are working in the dynamics of the real world. There is so much to be done and there is so much that can be done.

    Promotions, salary etc are the last thing on my mind. Nobody knows what is in the store 10 years after tomorrow, 30 years is a super long journey. One thing is sure that if you work super hard and utilize your skills to the fullest, you will never be short of money throughout your life. So the financial side is solved if you know this fact.

    The failures have given me so much of insights and learning about life that I thank my stars now. I am well equipped to handle most of the things in life whereas I didn't have any of these learnings when I graduated. Even if I had somehow passed the exam in the past, I would have definitely failed at some point and that would have been disastrous considering the fact that as a civil servant you are entrusted with heavy responsibilities.

    I may have lost the salary and promotions of last 5 years but I've gained life skills which are worth much more than that. I think, I would be very very happy to shoulder the responsibilities and serve the public at 28 rather than at 22 because I am now sure that my 22 year old personality was no where close to what is needed to be a civil servant.

    Again, I may have taken a little longer to learn to these things where as someone may have learnt these in a little lesser time. But I have zero regrets, it has been a thoroughly enriching journey and no matter how painful it has been I've totally enjoyed it.

    Age matters those who think small, a moment is enough for those who think big. And life is all about making the moments count.

    Life isn't upsc, life isn't about being the secretary to goi. Being a civil servant is just a tiny part of life. It's much much much larger than all that, you can do things that no one can even imagine. All you need is a clear and steady head that empowers you to do wonderful things, failures give you that.

    High five sir
    36 ka aankda with upsc
  • edited February 14
    pizzza said:

    I'm 26 now, if I make it in this 2019 attempt, I will be 28 when I join the training.

    You are right in your observations, because I've always had this question on my mind throughout my journey so far but recently I found out a personal answer to this.

    I'm not sure how others would feel but this is my personal opinion.

    When I was a fresh graduate, I only had small dreams and one of them was to pass this exam. I only knew how to dream but was rather inexperienced about how to live the dream, especially for something like this exam.

    I was well experienced on the creative side of the work, I was good at innovation but I barely had the experience of toiling day in and day out for a year or two, I dint know what consistency in efforts meant, I didn't know what patience meant, I didn't know what kind of efforts are required to compete on a all India level.

    The repeated failures taught me all this. And with each failure, the dreams started to widen their horizon beyond this exam. That is where i realized that passing this exam is only the beginning. The real task lies ahead of it when you are working in the dynamics of the real world. There is so much to be done and there is so much that can be done.

    Promotions, salary etc are the last thing on my mind. Nobody knows what is in the store 10 years after tomorrow, 30 years is a super long journey. One thing is sure that if you work super hard and utilize your skills to the fullest, you will never be short of money throughout your life. So the financial side is solved if you know this fact.

    The failures have given me so much of insights and learning about life that I thank my stars now. I am well equipped to handle most of the things in life whereas I didn't have any of these learnings when I graduated. Even if I had somehow passed the exam in the past, I would have definitely failed at some point and that would have been disastrous considering the fact that as a civil servant you are entrusted with heavy responsibilities.

    I may have lost the salary and promotions of last 5 years but I've gained life skills which are worth much more than that. I think, I would be very very happy to shoulder the responsibilities and serve the public at 28 rather than at 22 because I am now sure that my 22 year old personality was no where close to what is needed to be a civil servant.

    Again, I may have taken a little longer to learn to these things where as someone may have learnt these in a little lesser time. But I have zero regrets, it has been a thoroughly enriching journey and no matter how painful it has been I've totally enjoyed it.

    Age matters those who think small, a moment is enough for those who think big. And life is all about making the moments count.

    Life isn't upsc, life isn't about being the secretary to goi. Being a civil servant is just a tiny part of life. It's much much much larger than all that, you can do things that no one can even imagine. All you need is a clear and steady head that empowers you to do wonderful things, failures give you that.

    pizzza said:

    I'm 26 now, if I make it in this 2019 attempt, I will be 28 when I join the training.

    You are right in your observations, because I've always had this question on my mind throughout my journey so far but recently I found out a personal answer to this.

    I'm not sure how others would feel but this is my personal opinion.

    When I was a fresh graduate, I only had small dreams and one of them was to pass this exam. I only knew how to dream but was rather inexperienced about how to live the dream, especially for something like this exam.

    I was well experienced on the creative side of the work, I was good at innovation but I barely had the experience of toiling day in and day out for a year or two, I dint know what consistency in efforts meant, I didn't know what patience meant, I didn't know what kind of efforts are required to compete on a all India level.

    The repeated failures taught me all this. And with each failure, the dreams started to widen their horizon beyond this exam. That is where i realized that passing this exam is only the beginning. The real task lies ahead of it when you are working in the dynamics of the real world. There is so much to be done and there is so much that can be done.

    Promotions, salary etc are the last thing on my mind. Nobody knows what is in the store 10 years after tomorrow, 30 years is a super long journey. One thing is sure that if you work super hard and utilize your skills to the fullest, you will never be short of money throughout your life. So the financial side is solved if you know this fact.

    The failures have given me so much of insights and learning about life that I thank my stars now. I am well equipped to handle most of the things in life whereas I didn't have any of these learnings when I graduated. Even if I had somehow passed the exam in the past, I would have definitely failed at some point and that would have been disastrous considering the fact that as a civil servant you are entrusted with heavy responsibilities.

    I may have lost the salary and promotions of last 5 years but I've gained life skills which are worth much more than that. I think, I would be very very happy to shoulder the responsibilities and serve the public at 28 rather than at 22 because I am now sure that my 22 year old personality was no where close to what is needed to be a civil servant.

    Again, I may have taken a little longer to learn to these things where as someone may have learnt these in a little lesser time. But I have zero regrets, it has been a thoroughly enriching journey and no matter how painful it has been I've totally enjoyed it.

    Age matters those who think small, a moment is enough for those who think big. And life is all about making the moments count.

    Life isn't upsc, life isn't about being the secretary to goi. Being a civil servant is just a tiny part of life. It's much much much larger than all that, you can do things that no one can even imagine. All you need is a clear and steady head that empowers you to do wonderful things, failures give you that.

    Mark my words. This guy will Become writer one day.
    PSIR
  • @excellency @chokeslam @madeye
    Would be better if you would have just posted like this. Quote took away way too much space. :)

  • @pizzza
    Good views buddy. Can surely see your mental advancement.
  • edited February 15
    @LuckyKabooter
    Are you active here?
    This question was ideally intended to be answered by guys/girls like you.
    Shed some light if you are here.

    @Neyawn
    In case you find time, please share your experiences on various age cohorts you have known/interacted with. How do you perceive the success in varying ages.
  • Are there people who crack this exam at 31 or 32... and when they join they are 34...???
    IPS in making
  • Are there people who crack this exam at 31 or 32... and when they join they are 34...???

    In 2017 a guy from jharkhand...IAS 35+...reserve category tha...super qualified with lots of job and degree!!!
    KARMASUTRA,
    (n).when fate f**ks you all sorts of creative ways...
  • Are there people who crack this exam at 31 or 32... and when they join they are 34...???

    Rank 2 of 2017 batch
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