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Prelims answer key

2»

Comments

  • What right an aspiring employee possess that he wants to dictate his terms to make the recruitment process more transparent ?

    Is it not the prerogative of the employer to have the amount of transparency, or the lack thereof, in the recruitment process ?

    If an aspiring employee is unhappy with a particular organisation's recruitment policy, then should he not discard that organisation and look for another organisation whose recruitment process suits him ?

    At best, the aspiring employee can give his suggestions. How can filing a lawsuit against an organisation to make it twist it's recruitment process be called rational or logical? Sure, if there's evidence of corruption/cheating, by all means drag UPSC to court!

    Find out the flaw in my common sense or knowledge! I'm still learning.

    Bro you are perfect example as why we shd not expect any change in UPSC process. The basic questions here are 2 - Rule of Law ( and One Rule to guide all PSC on basic principles - When PSC can issue marks why not UPSC) and Law of natural justice ( A candidate has every right to see his answer copies - so that he can see where he made a mistake and how he can correct it and secondly was there any clerical mistake?).

    See as it is said in judiciary - Justice shd not only be done but it must seem to be done.

    Same way - for UPSC - Transparency/Accountability shd not only be on paper But shd be in spirit as well.

    Lawsuit is NOT d soln - we know how Govt behaves in such situations.

    Anyway - u r entitled to ur opinion.
    UPSC's choice.

    Maybe UPSC wants candidate with a certain thought process acquired on their own, instead of guided by his previous performance in UPSC. This' a defence UPSC can use successfully against the Natural Justice question.

    There's a reason that a person cannot take PABT (Pilot Aptitude Battery Test) the 2nd time for IAF. It gets easier the 2nd time. That doesn't make a good pilot, is the defence that IAF uses.
  • What right an aspiring employee possess that he wants to dictate his terms to make the recruitment process more transparent ?

    Is it not the prerogative of the employer to have the amount of transparency, or the lack thereof, in the recruitment process ?

    If an aspiring employee is unhappy with a particular organisation's recruitment policy, then should he not discard that organisation and look for another organisation whose recruitment process suits him ?

    At best, the aspiring employee can give his suggestions. How can filing a lawsuit against an organisation to make it twist it's recruitment process be called rational or logical? Sure, if there's evidence of corruption/cheating, by all means drag UPSC to court!

    Find out the flaw in my common sense or knowledge! I'm still learning.

    Bro you are perfect example as why we shd not expect any change in UPSC process. The basic questions here are 2 - Rule of Law ( and One Rule to guide all PSC on basic principles - When PSC can issue marks why not UPSC) and Law of natural justice ( A candidate has every right to see his answer copies - so that he can see where he made a mistake and how he can correct it and secondly was there any clerical mistake?).

    See as it is said in judiciary - Justice shd not only be done but it must seem to be done.

    Same way - for UPSC - Transparency/Accountability shd not only be on paper But shd be in spirit as well.

    Lawsuit is NOT d soln - we know how Govt behaves in such situations.

    Anyway - u r entitled to ur opinion.
    UPSC's choice.

    Maybe UPSC wants candidate with a certain thought process acquired on their own, instead of guided by his previous performance in UPSC. This' a defence UPSC can use successfully against the Natural Justice question.

    There's a reason that a person cannot take PABT (Pilot Aptitude Battery Test) the 2nd time for IAF. It gets easier the 2nd time. That doesn't make a good pilot, is the defence that IAF uses.

    What right an aspiring employee possess that he wants to dictate his terms to make the recruitment process more transparent ?

    Is it not the prerogative of the employer to have the amount of transparency, or the lack thereof, in the recruitment process ?

    If an aspiring employee is unhappy with a particular organisation's recruitment policy, then should he not discard that organisation and look for another organisation whose recruitment process suits him ?

    At best, the aspiring employee can give his suggestions. How can filing a lawsuit against an organisation to make it twist it's recruitment process be called rational or logical? Sure, if there's evidence of corruption/cheating, by all means drag UPSC to court!

    Find out the flaw in my common sense or knowledge! I'm still learning.

    Bro you are perfect example as why we shd not expect any change in UPSC process. The basic questions here are 2 - Rule of Law ( and One Rule to guide all PSC on basic principles - When PSC can issue marks why not UPSC) and Law of natural justice ( A candidate has every right to see his answer copies - so that he can see where he made a mistake and how he can correct it and secondly was there any clerical mistake?).

    See as it is said in judiciary - Justice shd not only be done but it must seem to be done.

    Same way - for UPSC - Transparency/Accountability shd not only be on paper But shd be in spirit as well.

    Lawsuit is NOT d soln - we know how Govt behaves in such situations.

    Anyway - u r entitled to ur opinion.
    UPSC's choice.

    Maybe UPSC wants candidate with a certain thought process acquired on their own, instead of guided by his previous performance in UPSC. This' a defence UPSC can use successfully against the Natural Justice question.

    There's a reason that a person cannot take PABT (Pilot Aptitude Battery Test) the 2nd time for IAF. It gets easier the 2nd time. That doesn't make a good pilot, is the defence that IAF uses.
    Ok got ur point. But in context of UPSC it is flawed. See firstly donot compare CSE processes with Armed Forces. Also, This PABT Rule is flawed in itself ( as per me). A person not getting selected in SSB first time and get recom in 2nd - is he lesser than 1st one? Most of our military rules are of British Era - fossilised - we r not make any changes - until recently- new SSB pattern is running as pilot project - lets see what happens. Also In Pak - one get to give only SSB 2 times - and In India we allow N - times - process of selection is almost the same ( British Heritage) so does it mean our Officers are lesser than theirs?
    PVC Cpt Vikram Batra got recommended after some 16 SSBs - does it mean he was lesser of a soldier?
    If there is a rule - it doenst mean rule is good? Rules r bound to change as per societies need.

    What abt state PSCs? Shdnt they too follow UPSC sstandard?

    I remember a case of 2007s ( somwthing) where a candidate had filed a case in some HC - to get his copies reevaluated- and it was found that- wrong entry was made by the clerk. Finally HC ordered DoPT to include this person in IAS ( yes he got 2 digit rank after reevaluation) and a special seat was made available to him since the person who was selected on his seat was also retained.

    So, in past there have been hints of makinf the process more transparent. Asking for Pre marks after pre result and answer key is not something which UPSC cant provide.
    Secondly- a start can be made by UPSC by atleast providing marks table of each paper - so atleast candidate can cross check about any totalling or clerical errors.

  • Prelims results should be like this
    Answer key
    No of questions attended,Correct,Wrong, Marks obtained, Cut off mark
    If all these details are given where comes the chance for dispute?

    It's MCQ exam, plain and simple.
    Also prelims marks not counted for final total. Then what makes UPSC to withhold prelims answer key, marks till final results!

    Way forward is making Prelims computer based and making it transparent.

    Here many aspirants expressing shock over their mains marks also. Even for that UPSC not taking responsibility!

    IMG_20180511_152956.png
    853 x 170 - 23K
    2018 Lottery round :#
    Lucky enough to get out of this shit >:)
  • What right an aspiring employee possess that he wants to dictate his terms to make the recruitment process more transparent ?

    Is it not the prerogative of the employer to have the amount of transparency, or the lack thereof, in the recruitment process ?

    If an aspiring employee is unhappy with a particular organisation's recruitment policy, then should he not discard that organisation and look for another organisation whose recruitment process suits him ?

    At best, the aspiring employee can give his suggestions. How can filing a lawsuit against an organisation to make it twist it's recruitment process be called rational or logical? Sure, if there's evidence of corruption/cheating, by all means drag UPSC to court!

    Find out the flaw in my common sense or knowledge! I'm still learning.

    Bro you are perfect example as why we shd not expect any change in UPSC process. The basic questions here are 2 - Rule of Law ( and One Rule to guide all PSC on basic principles - When PSC can issue marks why not UPSC) and Law of natural justice ( A candidate has every right to see his answer copies - so that he can see where he made a mistake and how he can correct it and secondly was there any clerical mistake?).

    See as it is said in judiciary - Justice shd not only be done but it must seem to be done.

    Same way - for UPSC - Transparency/Accountability shd not only be on paper But shd be in spirit as well.

    Lawsuit is NOT d soln - we know how Govt behaves in such situations.

    Anyway - u r entitled to ur opinion.
    UPSC's choice.

    Maybe UPSC wants candidate with a certain thought process acquired on their own, instead of guided by his previous performance in UPSC. This' a defence UPSC can use successfully against the Natural Justice question.

    There's a reason that a person cannot take PABT (Pilot Aptitude Battery Test) the 2nd time for IAF. It gets easier the 2nd time. That doesn't make a good pilot, is the defence that IAF uses.

    What right an aspiring employee possess that he wants to dictate his terms to make the recruitment process more transparent ?

    Is it not the prerogative of the employer to have the amount of transparency, or the lack thereof, in the recruitment process ?

    If an aspiring employee is unhappy with a particular organisation's recruitment policy, then should he not discard that organisation and look for another organisation whose recruitment process suits him ?

    At best, the aspiring employee can give his suggestions. How can filing a lawsuit against an organisation to make it twist it's recruitment process be called rational or logical? Sure, if there's evidence of corruption/cheating, by all means drag UPSC to court!

    Find out the flaw in my common sense or knowledge! I'm still learning.

    Bro you are perfect example as why we shd not expect any change in UPSC process. The basic questions here are 2 - Rule of Law ( and One Rule to guide all PSC on basic principles - When PSC can issue marks why not UPSC) and Law of natural justice ( A candidate has every right to see his answer copies - so that he can see where he made a mistake and how he can correct it and secondly was there any clerical mistake?).

    See as it is said in judiciary - Justice shd not only be done but it must seem to be done.

    Same way - for UPSC - Transparency/Accountability shd not only be on paper But shd be in spirit as well.

    Lawsuit is NOT d soln - we know how Govt behaves in such situations.

    Anyway - u r entitled to ur opinion.
    UPSC's choice.

    Maybe UPSC wants candidate with a certain thought process acquired on their own, instead of guided by his previous performance in UPSC. This' a defence UPSC can use successfully against the Natural Justice question.

    There's a reason that a person cannot take PABT (Pilot Aptitude Battery Test) the 2nd time for IAF. It gets easier the 2nd time. That doesn't make a good pilot, is the defence that IAF uses.
    Ok got ur point. But in context of UPSC it is flawed. See firstly donot compare CSE processes with Armed Forces. Also, This PABT Rule is flawed in itself ( as per me). A person not getting selected in SSB first time and get recom in 2nd - is he lesser than 1st one? Most of our military rules are of British Era - fossilised - we r not make any changes - until recently- new SSB pattern is running as pilot project - lets see what happens. Also In Pak - one get to give only SSB 2 times - and In India we allow N - times - process of selection is almost the same ( British Heritage) so does it mean our Officers are lesser than theirs?
    PVC Cpt Vikram Batra got recommended after some 16 SSBs - does it mean he was lesser of a soldier?
    If there is a rule - it doenst mean rule is good? Rules r bound to change as per societies need.

    What abt state PSCs? Shdnt they too follow UPSC sstandard?

    I remember a case of 2007s ( somwthing) where a candidate had filed a case in some HC - to get his copies reevaluated- and it was found that- wrong entry was made by the clerk. Finally HC ordered DoPT to include this person in IAS ( yes he got 2 digit rank after reevaluation) and a special seat was made available to him since the person who was selected on his seat was also retained.

    So, in past there have been hints of makinf the process more transparent. Asking for Pre marks after pre result and answer key is not something which UPSC cant provide.
    Secondly- a start can be made by UPSC by atleast providing marks table of each paper - so atleast candidate can cross check about any totalling or clerical errors.

    Alright.

  • Why UPSC standards have fallen low

    “King can do no wrong” is a common law principle which has almost lost its “sheen” in a pragmatic sense. However, the same doesn’t seem to be the case with the Union Public Service Commission (“UPSC”) wherein the norm seems to be “UPSC can do no wrong” in its absolute sense.

    This article intends to draw attention to certain crucial aspects that touch upon the very credibility of the examination process.

    UPSC civil services examination scheme
    UPSC conducts the prestigious examination in three stages; first being the prelims, the second being the mains and third being the interview. While the preliminary examination is objective in nature, the mains examination is subjective.

    The prelims consist of two papers (200 marks each) - Paper I being a general studies paper covers inter alia current events, history, geography, economic and social development and environmental issues; and Paper II being an aptitude paper covers inter alia comprehension, logical reasoning and numerical ability.

    The preliminary exam was conducted on June 18. The answer key of the examination is published the next year after the announcement of final results. Apparently, UPSC apprehends that the immediate release of the answer key will lead to litigation and filing of writ petitions which may throw out of gear the entire selection process. I intend to critique this assumption here.


    Further, I shall deal with the falling standards of questions in two articles. This article shall deal with pre-2016 question papers and the subsequent article shall deal with 2016 and 2017 question papers.

    Falling standards of questions

    A quality question should convey the same meaning to all reasonable candidates without ambiguity and without leading to divergent interpretations. Some of the questions in the civil services examination have been found to be wholly lacking this essential quality. For instance, consider the question stated below:

    Question 87 in general studies paper I (2013), booklet series A:
    Consider the following fauna of India:
    1) Gharial
    2) Leatherback Turtle
    3) Swamp Deer
    Which of the above is/are endangered?
    - 1 and 2 only
    - 3 only
    - 1, 2 and 3
    - None

    According to the answer key uploaded on the UPSC website, option C, that is, all the mentioned fauna, Gharial, Leatherback Turtle and Swamp Deer, are endangered. This is dubious for the following reasons:

    The International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN), an international organisation monitoring the decline in biodiversity worldwide, classifies all organisms into nine categories based on their risk perceptions.

    This classification is generally accepted all over the world. According to their categorisation, “critically endangered”, “endangered” and “vulnerable” form three distinct categories. An organism falling under the “critically endangered” category is at greater risk when compared to an organism falling under the “endangered” category, which in turn is at greater risk when compared to an organism falling under “vulnerable” category.

    According to the IUCN categorisation, the Gharial is critically endangered and the Leatherback Turtle and Swamp Deer are vulnerable.

    In March 2011, the ministry of environment and forests published a booklet titled “Critically endangered animal species of India”. This official document recognises the IUCN categorisation. According to this booklet, both Gharial and Leatherback Turtle are listed as critically endangered. The Swamp Deer is referred to as endangered.

    Going by either of these records, the UPSC answer that all three mentioned fauna are endangered is evidently wrong. Note that the risk categories are distinct and one does not form a subset of the other. If the examiner used the word “endangered” in a generic sense, does the question actually convey that meaning to a reasonable, well-informed candidate?

    Can a reasonable, well-informed candidate be blamed for understanding the question in its technical sense? Note that the aforesaid terms like critically endangered and endangered are used in their technical sense in serious academic discussions on risk perception of a particular species.

    Further, questions such as the feature which “best describes nirvana in Buddhism” (UPSC prelims, 2013) and “places associated with life of Buddha’ (UPSC prelims, 2014) were equally ambiguous. The answers of the aforesaid questions are highly subjective.

    There were also some ambiguous comprehension-based questions in Paper II, 2014. I would place these questions in the “lottery zone”. The answers to the aforesaid questions furnished by the answer keys of well-known coaching institutions also differ; eminent academicians also differ. Then nay to speak about the confusion of a candidate. The irresistible inference one draws is that the UPSC’s attitude towards setting questions has been casual, if not downright flippant and irresponsible.

    2018 Lottery round :#
    Lucky enough to get out of this shit >:)
  • Transparency and credibility
    Transparency will go a long way in ensuring the credibility and quality of the examination process.

    Transparency will go a long way in ensuring the credibility and quality of the process. The UPSC is at liberty to make the examination process very demanding; but it has no right to ask ambiguous questions.

    The so-called reason for the delay in releasing the answer key is not convincing. Let the answer key be released immediately after the exam and a window period of at least 2-3 days be given for receiving complaints. An expert panel can peruse the complaints, review the answers and release the revised answer key.

    Quite a few entrance examinations are conducted in the above manner. Even if a writ is filed against the revised key, the UPSC will not have to worry unless the impugned answer is patently erroneous.

    Generally, the judiciary will not interfere with the discretion of a constitutional body especially when it has a robust internal review and grievance redressal mechanism (unless the manner of exercise of discretion is perverse or the result of discretion is patently erroneous).

    In this regard, an advisory opinion from the Supreme Court under Article 143 of the Constitution can lay to rest all the apprehensions. It is quite evident that the release of answer key after the announcement of final results effectively negates any kind of grievance redressal mechanism.

    It is akin to the idea of judicial review after the imposition and implementation of capital punishment!

    Is the preliminary examination incongruous with the mains examination?
    It is also pertinent to take a closer look at the present scheme of the prelims introduced in 2011. The present scheme comprising the general studies Paper I and aptitude Paper II replaced the earlier scheme which had two papers: general studies Paper I and optional Paper II.

    The earlier scheme, in spite of some just criticisms, had a certain degree of logical continuity. The mains examination was the “advanced” stage of preliminary examination. This logical continuity is absent now. Further, aptitude paper II has become only a qualifying paper now. The entire selection is now based only on general studies Paper I and therefore, even the presence of one or two ambiguous questions is a serious blow to the genuine aspirants.

    This whole scheme is counter-intuitive. As the marks obtained in prelims are not counted for the computation of final marks for determination of ranks, it is clearly of a “filtering” nature. If the preliminary exam doesn’t enjoy logical continuity with the rest of the processes, and further, asks ambiguous questions, isn't the subjectivity element in this objective examination too high to be termed a just and fair examination process?

    The UPSC may consider asking more analytical (but unambiguous and non-subjective) questions in general studies Paper I. It seems UPSC has forgotten that the preliminary examination is an objective and not subjective examination.

    The UPSC has indeed asked some excellent questions which demand firm understanding of concepts. Unfortunately, that cannot be said for all the questions. The time has come for us to ponder over whether “UPSC can do no wrong”. After all, there is no “holy cow” in a nation governed by the principle of constitutionalism.

    https://www.dailyo.in/variety/upsc-civil-services-exam-prelims-mains-answer-key-general-studies-ambiguous-questions/story/1/18680.html
    2018 Lottery round :#
    Lucky enough to get out of this shit >:)
  • Prelims results should be like this
    Answer key
    No of questions attended,Correct,Wrong, Marks obtained, Cut off mark
    If all these details are given where comes the chance for dispute?

    It's MCQ exam, plain and simple.
    Also prelims marks not counted for final total. Then what makes UPSC to withhold prelims answer key, marks till final results!

    Way forward is making Prelims computer based and making it transparent.

    Here many aspirants expressing shock over their mains marks also. Even for that UPSC not taking responsibility!

    Computer based ?
    SSC Scam ke jese idhar bHi hone lagega
    pen and paper mode me kya pareshani hai tau?
  • Bad_Bunny said:

    Prelims results should be like this
    Answer key
    No of questions attended,Correct,Wrong, Marks obtained, Cut off mark
    If all these details are given where comes the chance for dispute?

    It's MCQ exam, plain and simple.
    Also prelims marks not counted for final total. Then what makes UPSC to withhold prelims answer key, marks till final results!

    Way forward is making Prelims computer based and making it transparent.

    Here many aspirants expressing shock over their mains marks also. Even for that UPSC not taking responsibility!

    Computer based ?
    SSC Scam ke jese idhar bHi hone lagega
    pen and paper mode me kya pareshani hai tau?
    What problem did Bullock Cart had after the advent of Motor Vehicle?
  • i am from rural india. i saw computer for the first time after my first pre.
  • _ramallah said:

    i am from rural india. i saw computer for the first time after my first pre.

    If our fate is like that, what can we do!

    UPSC couldn't care less.
  • Bad_Bunny said:

    Prelims results should be like this
    Answer key
    No of questions attended,Correct,Wrong, Marks obtained, Cut off mark
    If all these details are given where comes the chance for dispute?

    It's MCQ exam, plain and simple.
    Also prelims marks not counted for final total. Then what makes UPSC to withhold prelims answer key, marks till final results!

    Way forward is making Prelims computer based and making it transparent.

    Here many aspirants expressing shock over their mains marks also. Even for that UPSC not taking responsibility!

    Computer based ?
    SSC Scam ke jese idhar bHi hone lagega
    pen and paper mode me kya pareshani hai tau?
    What problem did Bullock Cart had after the advent of Motor Vehicle?
    Whataboutery gang :mrgreen:
  • Bad_Bunny said:

    Prelims results should be like this
    Answer key
    No of questions attended,Correct,Wrong, Marks obtained, Cut off mark
    If all these details are given where comes the chance for dispute?

    It's MCQ exam, plain and simple.
    Also prelims marks not counted for final total. Then what makes UPSC to withhold prelims answer key, marks till final results!

    Way forward is making Prelims computer based and making it transparent.

    Here many aspirants expressing shock over their mains marks also. Even for that UPSC not taking responsibility!

    Computer based ?
    SSC Scam ke jese idhar bHi hone lagega
    pen and paper mode me kya pareshani hai tau?
    What problem did Bullock Cart had after the advent of Motor Vehicle?
    *Same problem that Bullock Cart had after the advent of Motor Vehicle.

  • Why UPSC standards have fallen low

    “King can do no wrong” is a common law principle which has almost lost its “sheen” in a pragmatic sense. However, the same doesn’t seem to be the case with the Union Public Service Commission (“UPSC”) wherein the norm seems to be “UPSC can do no wrong” in its absolute sense.

    This article intends to draw attention to certain crucial aspects that touch upon the very credibility of the examination process.

    UPSC civil services examination scheme
    UPSC conducts the prestigious examination in three stages; first being the prelims, the second being the mains and third being the interview. While the preliminary examination is objective in nature, the mains examination is subjective.

    The prelims consist of two papers (200 marks each) - Paper I being a general studies paper covers inter alia current events, history, geography, economic and social development and environmental issues; and Paper II being an aptitude paper covers inter alia comprehension, logical reasoning and numerical ability.

    The preliminary exam was conducted on June 18. The answer key of the examination is published the next year after the announcement of final results. Apparently, UPSC apprehends that the immediate release of the answer key will lead to litigation and filing of writ petitions which may throw out of gear the entire selection process. I intend to critique this assumption here.


    Further, I shall deal with the falling standards of questions in two articles. This article shall deal with pre-2016 question papers and the subsequent article shall deal with 2016 and 2017 question papers.

    Falling standards of questions

    A quality question should convey the same meaning to all reasonable candidates without ambiguity and without leading to divergent interpretations. Some of the questions in the civil services examination have been found to be wholly lacking this essential quality. For instance, consider the question stated below:

    Question 87 in general studies paper I (2013), booklet series A:
    Consider the following fauna of India:
    1) Gharial
    2) Leatherback Turtle
    3) Swamp Deer
    Which of the above is/are endangered?
    - 1 and 2 only
    - 3 only
    - 1, 2 and 3
    - None

    According to the answer key uploaded on the UPSC website, option C, that is, all the mentioned fauna, Gharial, Leatherback Turtle and Swamp Deer, are endangered. This is dubious for the following reasons:

    The International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN), an international organisation monitoring the decline in biodiversity worldwide, classifies all organisms into nine categories based on their risk perceptions.

    This classification is generally accepted all over the world. According to their categorisation, “critically endangered”, “endangered” and “vulnerable” form three distinct categories. An organism falling under the “critically endangered” category is at greater risk when compared to an organism falling under the “endangered” category, which in turn is at greater risk when compared to an organism falling under “vulnerable” category.

    According to the IUCN categorisation, the Gharial is critically endangered and the Leatherback Turtle and Swamp Deer are vulnerable.

    In March 2011, the ministry of environment and forests published a booklet titled “Critically endangered animal species of India”. This official document recognises the IUCN categorisation. According to this booklet, both Gharial and Leatherback Turtle are listed as critically endangered. The Swamp Deer is referred to as endangered.

    Going by either of these records, the UPSC answer that all three mentioned fauna are endangered is evidently wrong. Note that the risk categories are distinct and one does not form a subset of the other. If the examiner used the word “endangered” in a generic sense, does the question actually convey that meaning to a reasonable, well-informed candidate?

    Can a reasonable, well-informed candidate be blamed for understanding the question in its technical sense? Note that the aforesaid terms like critically endangered and endangered are used in their technical sense in serious academic discussions on risk perception of a particular species.

    Further, questions such as the feature which “best describes nirvana in Buddhism” (UPSC prelims, 2013) and “places associated with life of Buddha’ (UPSC prelims, 2014) were equally ambiguous. The answers of the aforesaid questions are highly subjective.

    There were also some ambiguous comprehension-based questions in Paper II, 2014. I would place these questions in the “lottery zone”. The answers to the aforesaid questions furnished by the answer keys of well-known coaching institutions also differ; eminent academicians also differ. Then nay to speak about the confusion of a candidate. The irresistible inference one draws is that the UPSC’s attitude towards setting questions has been casual, if not downright flippant and irresponsible.

    I know this locha is so frustrating. UPSC goes by MoEFCC pdf in framing questions and we have IUCN classification to mug up separately.

  • Why UPSC standards have fallen low

    “King can do no wrong” is a common law principle which has almost lost its “sheen” in a pragmatic sense. However, the same doesn’t seem to be the case with the Union Public Service Commission (“UPSC”) wherein the norm seems to be “UPSC can do no wrong” in its absolute sense.

    This article intends to draw attention to certain crucial aspects that touch upon the very credibility of the examination process.

    UPSC civil services examination scheme
    UPSC conducts the prestigious examination in three stages; first being the prelims, the second being the mains and third being the interview. While the preliminary examination is objective in nature, the mains examination is subjective.

    The prelims consist of two papers (200 marks each) - Paper I being a general studies paper covers inter alia current events, history, geography, economic and social development and environmental issues; and Paper II being an aptitude paper covers inter alia comprehension, logical reasoning and numerical ability.

    The preliminary exam was conducted on June 18. The answer key of the examination is published the next year after the announcement of final results. Apparently, UPSC apprehends that the immediate release of the answer key will lead to litigation and filing of writ petitions which may throw out of gear the entire selection process. I intend to critique this assumption here.


    Further, I shall deal with the falling standards of questions in two articles. This article shall deal with pre-2016 question papers and the subsequent article shall deal with 2016 and 2017 question papers.

    Falling standards of questions

    A quality question should convey the same meaning to all reasonable candidates without ambiguity and without leading to divergent interpretations. Some of the questions in the civil services examination have been found to be wholly lacking this essential quality. For instance, consider the question stated below:

    Question 87 in general studies paper I (2013), booklet series A:
    Consider the following fauna of India:
    1) Gharial
    2) Leatherback Turtle
    3) Swamp Deer
    Which of the above is/are endangered?
    - 1 and 2 only
    - 3 only
    - 1, 2 and 3
    - None

    According to the answer key uploaded on the UPSC website, option C, that is, all the mentioned fauna, Gharial, Leatherback Turtle and Swamp Deer, are endangered. This is dubious for the following reasons:

    The International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN), an international organisation monitoring the decline in biodiversity worldwide, classifies all organisms into nine categories based on their risk perceptions.

    This classification is generally accepted all over the world. According to their categorisation, “critically endangered”, “endangered” and “vulnerable” form three distinct categories. An organism falling under the “critically endangered” category is at greater risk when compared to an organism falling under the “endangered” category, which in turn is at greater risk when compared to an organism falling under “vulnerable” category.

    According to the IUCN categorisation, the Gharial is critically endangered and the Leatherback Turtle and Swamp Deer are vulnerable.

    In March 2011, the ministry of environment and forests published a booklet titled “Critically endangered animal species of India”. This official document recognises the IUCN categorisation. According to this booklet, both Gharial and Leatherback Turtle are listed as critically endangered. The Swamp Deer is referred to as endangered.

    Going by either of these records, the UPSC answer that all three mentioned fauna are endangered is evidently wrong. Note that the risk categories are distinct and one does not form a subset of the other. If the examiner used the word “endangered” in a generic sense, does the question actually convey that meaning to a reasonable, well-informed candidate?

    Can a reasonable, well-informed candidate be blamed for understanding the question in its technical sense? Note that the aforesaid terms like critically endangered and endangered are used in their technical sense in serious academic discussions on risk perception of a particular species.

    Further, questions such as the feature which “best describes nirvana in Buddhism” (UPSC prelims, 2013) and “places associated with life of Buddha’ (UPSC prelims, 2014) were equally ambiguous. The answers of the aforesaid questions are highly subjective.

    There were also some ambiguous comprehension-based questions in Paper II, 2014. I would place these questions in the “lottery zone”. The answers to the aforesaid questions furnished by the answer keys of well-known coaching institutions also differ; eminent acad

  • edited February 18
    .
  • This is the time where ppl she strat pressurising upsc to release answer key just after preliminary exam.
    Upsc shd heed to this for better and transparent process.
    "Rise and rise again and again, Like the Phoenix from the ashes Until the lambs have become lions and the rule of Darkness is no more”
  • kuch nahi hoga bhai ,, agale janam pe UPSC na dijo
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