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Governor | Do we need it?

edited February 28 in Polity & Governance
In a polity like ours with numerous ceremonial posts, do we really need the post of Governor of State in our midst? Can we do away with this archaic colonial institution that is purely sinecure? With no utility, plush Raj Bhavans have become resting place for old folks with no significant contribution to governance. And with present realities, this institution has come to be identified with sheer nepotism and favoritism.

Like demonitisation, is it right time for de-pauperisation of our national purse by doing away with this office?

Please put across your views.
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Comments

  • Yes, we need him/her.
    An Ounce of Action Is Worth a Ton of Theory
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  • Yes we need him
    1. he is rep of union at center. He thus acts as coordinating agency by expressing concerns of state govt to center thus helping federal equilibrium. on other side, he may warn state govt if it persues antisecular politics.
    2. he mentions knw hows about state to center via governor report to president. this helps in rational use of exercising state emergency
    3. all the executive actions and appointments will take place in name of governor. without him, executive at state is standstill
    But oflate
    1. governor post is subject of politisation. party loyalists have been appointed. Further often he was removed by whims and fancies of central govt. So, this may lead to threatening sanctiity of post of governor.

    So we need him but we need to strengthen the post by apponting non-political personnel of immpecable integrity and person of national eminenece; Further sanctifiy by prescriibing selection criteria, eligbility considution, secure tenure in consituttion.
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  • We need ...total anarchy....... ;)
    You talk when u cease to be at peace with your mind
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  • What are the challenges in handing over Governor's responsibility to Vice-President?
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  • it is not possible.
    Governor is executive head of state. it violates federal equilibrium. Vice-president as such does not have regular functions. In normal circumstances, his role is seen as chairperson of rajyasabha. Vice-presudent no way rep states. While as chaiman of Rajyasabha, he ensures federal equilibrium. Here it is not vice-president but chairman of upper house.
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  • Yes we need him
    1. he is rep of union at center. He thus acts as coordinating agency by expressing concerns of state govt to center thus helping federal equilibrium. on other side, he may warn state govt if it persues antisecular politics.
    2. he mentions knw hows about state to center via governor report to president. this helps in rational use of exercising state emergency
    3. all the executive actions and appointments will take place in name of governor. without him, executive at state is standstill
    But oflate
    1. governor post is subject of politisation. party loyalists have been appointed. Further often he was removed by whims and fancies of central govt. So, this may lead to threatening sanctiity of post of governor.

    So we need him but we need to strengthen the post by apponting non-political personnel of immpecable integrity and person of national eminenece; Further sanctifiy by prescriibing selection criteria, eligbility considution, secure tenure in consituttion.

    I agree with the Needs for Exam Basis. But for a realistic debate let's open the Pandora's Box -

    Why not replace the reports and requirements of Governor with Civil Servants(for Art 356 - anonymous voting among Incumbents for a better ground zero picture) / CM(signing authority for Bills etc,) / Anti-secular Activities (courts) ?

    Governor post has become a ground for nepotism and all unethical practices as pointed out by you.The Governor is governed by President who is just titular head of the nation. As such the recent acceptance of posts of Governor by CJI - Kerala, Mizoram Guv Case, Gujarat Guv Case are examples of how the Governor post is subject to misuse by Unethical Elements.
    Either be the best or die trying..
    ·
  • Yes, we need him/her.

    Yes we need him
    1. he is rep of union at center. He thus acts as coordinating agency by expressing concerns of state govt to center thus helping federal equilibrium. on other side, he may warn state govt if it persues antisecular politics.
    2. he mentions knw hows about state to center via governor report to president. this helps in rational use of exercising state emergency
    3. all the executive actions and appointments will take place in name of governor. without him, executive at state is standstill
    But oflate
    1. governor post is subject of politisation. party loyalists have been appointed. Further often he was removed by whims and fancies of central govt. So, this may lead to threatening sanctiity of post of governor.

    So we need him but we need to strengthen the post by apponting non-political personnel of immpecable integrity and person of national eminenece; Further sanctifiy by prescriibing selection criteria, eligbility considution, secure tenure in consituttion.

    I agree with the Needs for Exam Basis. But for a realistic debate let's open the Pandora's Box -

    Why not replace the reports and requirements of Governor with Civil Servants(for Art 356 - anonymous voting among Incumbents for a better ground zero picture) / CM(signing authority for Bills etc,) / Anti-secular Activities (courts) ?

    Governor post has become a ground for nepotism and all unethical practices as pointed out by you.The Governor is governed by President who is just titular head of the nation. As such the recent acceptance of posts of Governor by CJI - Kerala, Mizoram Guv Case, Gujarat Guv Case are examples of how the Governor post is subject to misuse by Unethical Elements.
    Civil servants in service should work in anonymity. Thus, they under no circumstances should be allowed to impact the policy-making of a democratically elected government/chief minister. They are the executive wing as they execute the policies formed by a government. Hence, in-service civil servants cant be made head(s) of a particular state (their cadre).

    Post retirement though, they can be, and that's the norm usually followed in some states.
    An Ounce of Action Is Worth a Ton of Theory
    ·
  • It's a good post-retirement attachment for senior politicians and bureaucrats. Don't take it away. It has some critical functions where it can exercise its discretion. And how many of you can put your hand on your heart and say that you don't like governor's rule?
    Dead and departed general caste player. RIP.
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  • edited March 13
    The governor, despite largely being a ceremonial office, shouldn't be done away with.
    The governor has the power to reserve bills for the consideration of the president. If the office of governor didn't exist, state legislatures would make draconian laws as they would wish. When a reserved bill is considered by the union com, it is likely that the outcome is goin to be more just because it's done from a rather neutral perspective and mostly by people who aren't influenced by the politics of that particular state.
    The governor also performs some special role in particular states like Maharashtra, Gujarat, Nagaland, Assam etc regarding backwardness of particular regions, law and order etc. These issues require a human touch and who would be better than an experienced politician/administrator to deal with them. It's a fulfilment of the union's responsibility towards communities and issues where the state govt has failed miserably.
    Agreed that most of the functions performed by the governor can be fulfilled by an IAS officer. But when it comes to sensitive decisions like wether to let a party that is yet to win a confidence vote stay or dissolve the assembly, wether to write to the president asking for presidents rule or not, making decisions regarding what exactly amounts to the failure of constitutional machinery in the state etc cannot be taken by an IAS officer, in fact shouldn't be taken by an IAS officer because civil servants are expected to be politically neutral. Decisions like these have to be taken in the light of the political realities of the time, and it's better to keep civil servants away from them because it could lead to blame games. These matters fall into the realm of politics and judiciary.
    The office of governor sort of acts as grease between the cogs of the centre and state. In the era of multiparty democracy particularly, there may be different parties at the centre and the state and the realations between the two could get fraught and sometimes outrightly abusive because of disagreements on certain issues. The governor acts as a shock absorber here. And this is where a part of your question gets answered too. Why so much ritualistic spending of tax money on his office? Because this office that acts as line of communication between the centre and the state has been granted such sanctity by the Constitution, nobody would dare show any contempt towards it. So it has to grand AF, larger than life.
    As an extension to one of my earlier points, the fact that conventionally the governor doesn't belong to that state goes on to display that we are being watched by someone from a neutral perspective, we are citizens of India, not of that state, it's a constant reminder that everything that is legal in your state is being executed under his/her name. And he/she has been appointed by the centre, ergo the centre is your baap, no matter whether u like it or not. While this subtle msg is not paid much attention to in most of the mainland states, but I think it's potent enough a msg to some belligerents.
    I have failed upsc mains a couple of times.
    ·
  • I think rather than removing position of governor we should have zones 5/6 with each being governor of 5/6 states would reduce expenditure!!
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  • edited March 13
    Dere r two parking lot/old age home for politicians n officials .Constitutional n non constitutional.Const is Governor.non-constitutional for Congress it's Bjp n for Bjp it's margdharsak manadal ;)
    ·
  • buddhu said:

    The governor, despite largely being a ceremonial office, shouldn't be done away with.
    The governor has the power to reserve bills for the consideration of the president. If the office of governor didn't exist, state legislatures would make draconian laws as they would wish. When a reserved bill is considered by the union com, it is likely that the outcome is goin to be more just because it's done from a rather neutral perspective and mostly by people who aren't influenced by the politics of that particular state.
    The governor also performs some special role in particular states like Maharashtra, Gujarat, Nagaland, Assam etc regarding backwardness of particular regions, law and order etc. These issues require a human touch and who would be better than an experienced politician/administrator to deal with them. It's a fulfilment of the union's responsibility towards communities and issues where the state govt has failed miserably.
    Agreed that most of the functions performed by the governor can be fulfilled by an IAS officer. But when it comes to sensitive decisions like wether to let a party that is yet to win a confidence vote stay or dissolve the assembly, wether to write to the president asking for presidents rule or not, making decisions regarding what exactly amounts to the failure of constitutional machinery in the state etc cannot be taken by an IAS officer, in fact shouldn't be taken by an IAS officer because civil servants are expected to be politically neutral. Decisions like these have to be taken in the light of the political realities of the time, and it's better to keep civil servants away from them because it could lead to blame games. These matters fall into the realm of politics and judiciary.
    The office of governor sort of acts as grease between the cogs of the centre and state. In the era of multiparty democracy particularly, there may be different parties at the centre and the state and the realations between the two could get fraught and sometimes outrightly abusive because of disagreements on certain issues. The governor acts as a shock absorber here. And this is where a part of your question gets answered too. Why so much ritualistic spending of tax money on his office? Because this office that acts as line of communication between the centre and the state has been granted such sanctity by the Constitution, nobody would dare show any contempt towards it. So it has to grand AF, larger than life.
    As an extension to one of my earlier points, the fact that conventionally the governor doesn't belong to that state goes on to display that we are being watched by someone from a neutral perspective, we are citizens of India, not of that state, it's a constant reminder that everything that is legal in your state is being executed under his/her name. And he/she has been appointed by the centre, ergo the centre is your baap, no matter whether u like it or not. While this subtle msg is not paid much attention to in most of the mainland states, but I think it's potent enough a msg to some belligerents.


    If you break the ans in points and add some current examples it would become a very good mains answer. :smile:
    Man is sometimes extraordinarily, passionately, in love with suffering.
    ·
  • :) Thanks. Will try to incorporate.

    buddhu said:

    The governor, despite largely being a ceremonial office, shouldn't be done away with.
    The governor has the power to reserve bills for the consideration of the president. If the office of governor didn't exist, state legislatures would make draconian laws as they would wish. When a reserved bill is considered by the union com, it is likely that the outcome is goin to be more just because it's done from a rather neutral perspective and mostly by people who aren't influenced by the politics of that particular state.
    The governor also performs some special role in particular states like Maharashtra, Gujarat, Nagaland, Assam etc regarding backwardness of particular regions, law and order etc. These issues require a human touch and who would be better than an experienced politician/administrator to deal with them. It's a fulfilment of the union's responsibility towards communities and issues where the state govt has failed miserably.
    Agreed that most of the functions performed by the governor can be fulfilled by an IAS officer. But when it comes to sensitive decisions like wether to let a party that is yet to win a confidence vote stay or dissolve the assembly, wether to write to the president asking for presidents rule or not, making decisions regarding what exactly amounts to the failure of constitutional machinery in the state etc cannot be taken by an IAS officer, in fact shouldn't be taken by an IAS officer because civil servants are expected to be politically neutral. Decisions like these have to be taken in the light of the political realities of the time, and it's better to keep civil servants away from them because it could lead to blame games. These matters fall into the realm of politics and judiciary.
    The office of governor sort of acts as grease between the cogs of the centre and state. In the era of multiparty democracy particularly, there may be different parties at the centre and the state and the realations between the two could get fraught and sometimes outrightly abusive because of disagreements on certain issues. The governor acts as a shock absorber here. And this is where a part of your question gets answered too. Why so much ritualistic spending of tax money on his office? Because this office that acts as line of communication between the centre and the state has been granted such sanctity by the Constitution, nobody would dare show any contempt towards it. So it has to grand AF, larger than life.
    As an extension to one of my earlier points, the fact that conventionally the governor doesn't belong to that state goes on to display that we are being watched by someone from a neutral perspective, we are citizens of India, not of that state, it's a constant reminder that everything that is legal in your state is being executed under his/her name. And he/she has been appointed by the centre, ergo the centre is your baap, no matter whether u like it or not. While this subtle msg is not paid much attention to in most of the mainland states, but I think it's potent enough a msg to some belligerents.


    If you break the ans in points and add some current examples it would become a very good mains answer. :smile:
    I have failed upsc mains a couple of times.
    ·
  • @buddhu thank you. That was elaborate. :-)

    I think rather than removing position of governor we should have zones 5/6 with each being governor of 5/6 states would reduce expenditure!!

    Do you mean like the zonal councils that we have now? Yes.. that's an idea we can think about.
    ·
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